Mt. Washington – Home of the worst weather in the world

Posted: July 12, 2006 in Misc., My Opinion, Places

I like to think of myself as an avid mountain climber.  There is no experience like spending the day climbing one of the talles peaks in the area and finally, after hours of hard work, sweat and frustration reaching the top and looking over the land below.  I have climbed Mt. Washington in New Hampshire many times.  One time, I climbed it twice in a day.  Now this is no amazing achievement but it is still something I will be proud of for the rest of my life.  Mt. Washington, for those of you who don’t know it, is located in the white mountains in New Hampshire.  Its elevation is 6,822 feet and is known to have some of the worst weather in the world.  I’m sure you are asking how this is possible.  Surely Mt. Everst and K2 and dozens of other mountains have worse weather than Mt. Washington.  ON a typical day, this is true.  Mt. Wahington actually received this badge of honor becuase of one day in history.  On April 12th, 1934 the highest surface wind ever measured was clocked by observatory staff atop Mt. Washington.  Wind speeds of up to 231 mph were measured that day.  This fact gave merit to the belief that Mt. Washington was capable of extreme weather and should be regarded as a dangerous mountain, just like mountains two and three times its size.  Statistics aside, I highly recommend spedning a day climbing Mt. Washington and exploring the woods of the presidential and white mountain range.  Below is a picture of the white mountains taken from an observatory atop Loon mountain.

view-from-loon.jpg

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